Photo Information

Lt. Cmdr. Jonathan Long, right, representing the fires officer of the Expeditionary Strike Group 3, and Cpl. Charles Stephens, a command control communications computer specialist with 1st Marine Expeditionary Brigade, practice coordinating fire missions during Large Scale Exercise 2014 at Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, California, Aug. 10, 2014. LSE-14 is a bilateral training exercise conducted by 1st MEB to build U.S. and Canadian forces’ joint capabilities through live, simulated, and constructive military training activities. The exercise also promotes interoperability and cooperation between joint, coalition, and U.S. Marine Forces, providing the opportunity to exchange knowledge and learn from each other, establish personal and professional relationships and hone individual and small-unit skills through challenging, complex and realistic live scenarios with special focus on building combat power ashore.

Photo by Cpl. Corey Dabney

MEB, ESG personnel project sea power ashore at LSE-14

12 Aug 2014 | Cpl. Corey Dabney

Marines and Navy personnel have worked side-by-side since the inception of the Marine Corps. So, it a common sight to see Marines and Sailors working closely together. What isn’t a common sight is to see a Marine Expeditionary Brigade and sailors from an Expeditionary Strike Group working alongside one another ashore.  
 
Such a sight can be witnessed here as Marines with 1st Marine Expeditionary Brigade and Sailors with Expeditionary Strike Group 3 work together to complete Large Scale Exercise 2014 at Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms.
 
An Expeditionary Strike Group combines the surface, submarine, and patrol capabilities of a Naval Amphibious Ready Group with the combat power of a Marine Air Ground Task Force scalable to a particular contingency.
 
LSE-14 is a bilateral training exercise being conducted by 1st MEB to build MAGTF and Canadian forces’ joint capabilities through live, simulated, and constructive military training activities.
The exercise also promotes interoperability and cooperation between joint, international, and U.S. Marine Forces, providing the opportunity to exchange knowledge and learn from each other, establish personal and professional relationships and hone individual and small-unit skills through challenging, complex and realistic live scenarios with special focus on building combat power ashore.
 
The Marine Corps and Navy are teaming up to get back to those amphibious roots, according to Lt. Cmdr. Jonathan Long, the acting fires officer representing ESG 3 here. If the MEB deploys to respond to a crisis anywhere around the world it may need an ESG to help transport it in a timely manner. 
 
“Let’s say a natural disaster occurred, and sending a Marine Expeditionary Unit doesn’t have the capabilities or man power to effectively improve and sustain the situation — then the Marines will send a MEB which brings a larger range of capabilities,’ said Long, 32, from Atlanta, Georgia. “When the MEB is sent it needs an equivalent amount of naval force to transport them to the location.”
 
The Marines and the Navy then team up to make ensure that they have the most capable force on the ground within a 72-hour window, said Lt. Jeoff Dick, the future operations and training officer representing ESG 3 here. 
 
“That’s what makes the Marine Corps and the Navy such a dynamic force, because we have the capabilities to get anywhere in the world in such a short amount of time,” added Long. “We are also battlefield changers because we bring that tenacity to the fight.”
 
With the war in Afghanistan dwindling down, the Marines and the Navy have refocused their training back toward conventional warfare and humanitarian response. By working together throughout LSE-14, the duo can learn from one another and continue the Navy-Marine Corps team’s legacy of being the most ready force in the world.