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I Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF) Information Group (I MIG) provides administrative, training, and logistical support while in CONUS and forward deployed to the I MEF and I MEB Command Elements. Additionally, function as Higher Headquarters for the four Major Subordinate Elements in order to allow I MEF CE to execute warfighting functions in support of service and COCOM initiatives as required.

Plan and direct, collect process, produce and disseminate intelligence, and provide, counterintelligence support to the MEF Command Element, MEF major subordinate commands, subordinate Marine Air Group Task Force(MAGTF), and other commands as directed

Photo Information

First Lt. Bryant Yee, an adviser with Police Advisor Team 4, talks to a shopkeeper in Kajaki district, Afghanistan, July 10, 2012. The PAT is responsible for training and supporting the Afghan Uniformed Police to help them become self-sufficient.

Photo by Cpl. Kenneth Jasik

Marine advisors mentor Afghan police in Kajaki

22 Jul 2012 | Cpl. Kenneth Jasik

KAJAKI DISTRICT, Afghanistan – Marines with the Kajaki Police Advisor Team have been working with local security officials since they arrived in Afghanistan, nearly a month ago.

The main purpose of the Camp Lejune-based Police Advisor Team 4 is to build upon the skills of the Afghanistan Uniformed Police, who protect the citizens from crime and insurgent activity.

“We are here to advise the AUP on what the proper things to do are, and the proper way to do them,” said Sgt. Richard T. Stroud, a tactical adviser for the AUP. “We are setting them up through the advising process and setting up their supply and making sure they know how to get the equipment and personnel they need.”

The team of Marines is made up of military police and infantrymen so the Afghans can learn from both skill sets.

We teach things police should know such as handcuffing, and proper ways to search and our team helps teach patrolling, said Cpl. Tyler J. Ilgen, an MP with the Kajaki Police Advisor Team.

The Marines replaced a similar team July 1. The new team says their predecessors strengthened the AUP and helped locals feel safer with the Afghan security forces.

The previous adviser team was the first one working in this area, said Ilgen.

“The previous adviser team did a good job, and we’re here to make these guys more effective,” said Ilgen, 22, Sheridan, Wyo. “We want people to feel safe with the government and local police and not so much with insurgents.”

The Marines know that teaching the AUP to be effective and making them a strong force is the best way for peace in the county.

“By the time we leave, hopefully they will be completely self-sufficient and we won’t have to have anyone replace us,” said Stroud, 25, from Benton, La.




Read more: http://www.dvidshub.net/news/91971/marine-advisors-mentor-afghan-police-kajaki#ixzz221felGEJ

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Photo Information

First Lt. Bryant Yee, an adviser with Police Advisor Team 4, talks to a shopkeeper in Kajaki district, Afghanistan, July 10, 2012. The PAT is responsible for training and supporting the Afghan Uniformed Police to help them become self-sufficient.

Photo by Cpl. Kenneth Jasik

Marine advisors mentor Afghan police in Kajaki

22 Jul 2012 | Cpl. Kenneth Jasik

KAJAKI DISTRICT, Afghanistan – Marines with the Kajaki Police Advisor Team have been working with local security officials since they arrived in Afghanistan, nearly a month ago.

The main purpose of the Camp Lejune-based Police Advisor Team 4 is to build upon the skills of the Afghanistan Uniformed Police, who protect the citizens from crime and insurgent activity.

“We are here to advise the AUP on what the proper things to do are, and the proper way to do them,” said Sgt. Richard T. Stroud, a tactical adviser for the AUP. “We are setting them up through the advising process and setting up their supply and making sure they know how to get the equipment and personnel they need.”

The team of Marines is made up of military police and infantrymen so the Afghans can learn from both skill sets.

We teach things police should know such as handcuffing, and proper ways to search and our team helps teach patrolling, said Cpl. Tyler J. Ilgen, an MP with the Kajaki Police Advisor Team.

The Marines replaced a similar team July 1. The new team says their predecessors strengthened the AUP and helped locals feel safer with the Afghan security forces.

The previous adviser team was the first one working in this area, said Ilgen.

“The previous adviser team did a good job, and we’re here to make these guys more effective,” said Ilgen, 22, Sheridan, Wyo. “We want people to feel safe with the government and local police and not so much with insurgents.”

The Marines know that teaching the AUP to be effective and making them a strong force is the best way for peace in the county.

“By the time we leave, hopefully they will be completely self-sufficient and we won’t have to have anyone replace us,” said Stroud, 25, from Benton, La.




Read more: http://www.dvidshub.net/news/91971/marine-advisors-mentor-afghan-police-kajaki#ixzz221felGEJ

Tags
Photo Information

First Lt. Bryant Yee, an adviser with Police Advisor Team 4, talks to a shopkeeper in Kajaki district, Afghanistan, July 10, 2012. The PAT is responsible for training and supporting the Afghan Uniformed Police to help them become self-sufficient.

Photo by Cpl. Kenneth Jasik

Marine advisors mentor Afghan police in Kajaki

22 Jul 2012 | Cpl. Kenneth Jasik

KAJAKI DISTRICT, Afghanistan – Marines with the Kajaki Police Advisor Team have been working with local security officials since they arrived in Afghanistan, nearly a month ago.

The main purpose of the Camp Lejune-based Police Advisor Team 4 is to build upon the skills of the Afghanistan Uniformed Police, who protect the citizens from crime and insurgent activity.

“We are here to advise the AUP on what the proper things to do are, and the proper way to do them,” said Sgt. Richard T. Stroud, a tactical adviser for the AUP. “We are setting them up through the advising process and setting up their supply and making sure they know how to get the equipment and personnel they need.”

The team of Marines is made up of military police and infantrymen so the Afghans can learn from both skill sets.

We teach things police should know such as handcuffing, and proper ways to search and our team helps teach patrolling, said Cpl. Tyler J. Ilgen, an MP with the Kajaki Police Advisor Team.

The Marines replaced a similar team July 1. The new team says their predecessors strengthened the AUP and helped locals feel safer with the Afghan security forces.

The previous adviser team was the first one working in this area, said Ilgen.

“The previous adviser team did a good job, and we’re here to make these guys more effective,” said Ilgen, 22, Sheridan, Wyo. “We want people to feel safe with the government and local police and not so much with insurgents.”

The Marines know that teaching the AUP to be effective and making them a strong force is the best way for peace in the county.

“By the time we leave, hopefully they will be completely self-sufficient and we won’t have to have anyone replace us,” said Stroud, 25, from Benton, La.




Read more: http://www.dvidshub.net/news/91971/marine-advisors-mentor-afghan-police-kajaki#ixzz221felGEJ

Tags