Collapse All Expand All
 

I Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF) Information Group (I MIG) provides administrative, training, and logistical support while in CONUS and forward deployed to the I MEF and I MEB Command Elements. Additionally, function as Higher Headquarters for the four Major Subordinate Elements in order to allow I MEF CE to execute warfighting functions in support of service and COCOM initiatives as required.

Plan and direct, collect process, produce and disseminate intelligence, and provide, counterintelligence support to the MEF Command Element, MEF major subordinate commands, subordinate Marine Air Group Task Force(MAGTF), and other commands as directed

Photo Information

Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy, Mike Stevens, visited with sailors aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., July 18, 2014. During his visit Stevens took open questions from sailors to see what they were most concerned about.

Photo by Lance Cpl. John Baker

MCPON visits sailors aboard Camp Pendleton

25 Jul 2014 | Lance Cpl. John Baker

Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Mike Stevens, visited sailors aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, July 18, 2014. During his visit Stevens took open questions from sailors to address their concerns.

Stevens said he wanted to ensure the sailors aboard Camp Pendleton know that they are appreciated and never forgotten.
 
“The purpose of coming to Camp Pendleton is to thank our hard working sailors,” said Stevens. “I believe it’s important to visit all of our sailors to hear their concerns and feedback.” 

During the visit Stevens spent time getting to know the sailors and informing them on the future of the Navy. He said this dispels rumors and provides sailors with the information they need

“I think it’s important for our sailors to have an opportunity to connect with senior leadership in the Navy,” said Stevens. “To hear what’s going on, any updates to policy, and know about the things that may have an impact on their families.” 

Sailors from all over Camp Pendleton came to hear Stevens speak. 

Petty Officer 1st Class Chadric Gibson, 37, of Fort Valley, Georgia, a hospital medic and leading petty officer for the 11th Regimental Aid Station, said he and other sailors really appreciate these visits.

Gibson said visits like this are rare on Marine Corps bases, and give sailors a brighter outlook on the Navy and incentive to reenlist.  

“Most higher-ups don’t come speak with junior sailors,” said Gibson, “it gives us something to look forward to and a mindset of, ‘if he can do it, I can too.’”

Stevens’ leadership is a very direct and honest style in Gibson’s opinion. He said he believes that Stevens’ leadership style is admirable.

“He is intrusive, forthcoming and honest,” said, Gibson, “He doesn’t hide anything from you, which is a great leadership style.”

Stevens said he came here to ensure that the sailors know that their service is appreciated even at the highest levels.
Stevens strives to ensure every decision the Navy makes is made to benefit the sailors and their family while still accomplishing the Navy’s mission to the highest of standards. 

“I think the most important thing they can take away is to know we appreciate their service and their sacrifice,” said Stevens. “Every decision that we make is made with a great deal of thought and care to ensure optimal family readiness.”
Photo Information

Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy, Mike Stevens, visited with sailors aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., July 18, 2014. During his visit Stevens took open questions from sailors to see what they were most concerned about.

Photo by Lance Cpl. John Baker

MCPON visits sailors aboard Camp Pendleton

25 Jul 2014 | Lance Cpl. John Baker

Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Mike Stevens, visited sailors aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, July 18, 2014. During his visit Stevens took open questions from sailors to address their concerns.

Stevens said he wanted to ensure the sailors aboard Camp Pendleton know that they are appreciated and never forgotten.
 
“The purpose of coming to Camp Pendleton is to thank our hard working sailors,” said Stevens. “I believe it’s important to visit all of our sailors to hear their concerns and feedback.” 

During the visit Stevens spent time getting to know the sailors and informing them on the future of the Navy. He said this dispels rumors and provides sailors with the information they need

“I think it’s important for our sailors to have an opportunity to connect with senior leadership in the Navy,” said Stevens. “To hear what’s going on, any updates to policy, and know about the things that may have an impact on their families.” 

Sailors from all over Camp Pendleton came to hear Stevens speak. 

Petty Officer 1st Class Chadric Gibson, 37, of Fort Valley, Georgia, a hospital medic and leading petty officer for the 11th Regimental Aid Station, said he and other sailors really appreciate these visits.

Gibson said visits like this are rare on Marine Corps bases, and give sailors a brighter outlook on the Navy and incentive to reenlist.  

“Most higher-ups don’t come speak with junior sailors,” said Gibson, “it gives us something to look forward to and a mindset of, ‘if he can do it, I can too.’”

Stevens’ leadership is a very direct and honest style in Gibson’s opinion. He said he believes that Stevens’ leadership style is admirable.

“He is intrusive, forthcoming and honest,” said, Gibson, “He doesn’t hide anything from you, which is a great leadership style.”

Stevens said he came here to ensure that the sailors know that their service is appreciated even at the highest levels.
Stevens strives to ensure every decision the Navy makes is made to benefit the sailors and their family while still accomplishing the Navy’s mission to the highest of standards. 

“I think the most important thing they can take away is to know we appreciate their service and their sacrifice,” said Stevens. “Every decision that we make is made with a great deal of thought and care to ensure optimal family readiness.”
Photo Information

Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy, Mike Stevens, visited with sailors aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., July 18, 2014. During his visit Stevens took open questions from sailors to see what they were most concerned about.

Photo by Lance Cpl. John Baker

MCPON visits sailors aboard Camp Pendleton

25 Jul 2014 | Lance Cpl. John Baker

Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Mike Stevens, visited sailors aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, July 18, 2014. During his visit Stevens took open questions from sailors to address their concerns.

Stevens said he wanted to ensure the sailors aboard Camp Pendleton know that they are appreciated and never forgotten.
 
“The purpose of coming to Camp Pendleton is to thank our hard working sailors,” said Stevens. “I believe it’s important to visit all of our sailors to hear their concerns and feedback.” 

During the visit Stevens spent time getting to know the sailors and informing them on the future of the Navy. He said this dispels rumors and provides sailors with the information they need

“I think it’s important for our sailors to have an opportunity to connect with senior leadership in the Navy,” said Stevens. “To hear what’s going on, any updates to policy, and know about the things that may have an impact on their families.” 

Sailors from all over Camp Pendleton came to hear Stevens speak. 

Petty Officer 1st Class Chadric Gibson, 37, of Fort Valley, Georgia, a hospital medic and leading petty officer for the 11th Regimental Aid Station, said he and other sailors really appreciate these visits.

Gibson said visits like this are rare on Marine Corps bases, and give sailors a brighter outlook on the Navy and incentive to reenlist.  

“Most higher-ups don’t come speak with junior sailors,” said Gibson, “it gives us something to look forward to and a mindset of, ‘if he can do it, I can too.’”

Stevens’ leadership is a very direct and honest style in Gibson’s opinion. He said he believes that Stevens’ leadership style is admirable.

“He is intrusive, forthcoming and honest,” said, Gibson, “He doesn’t hide anything from you, which is a great leadership style.”

Stevens said he came here to ensure that the sailors know that their service is appreciated even at the highest levels.
Stevens strives to ensure every decision the Navy makes is made to benefit the sailors and their family while still accomplishing the Navy’s mission to the highest of standards. 

“I think the most important thing they can take away is to know we appreciate their service and their sacrifice,” said Stevens. “Every decision that we make is made with a great deal of thought and care to ensure optimal family readiness.”