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I Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF) Information Group (I MIG) provides administrative, training, and logistical support while in CONUS and forward deployed to the I MEF and I MEB Command Elements. Additionally, function as Higher Headquarters for the four Major Subordinate Elements in order to allow I MEF CE to execute warfighting functions in support of service and COCOM initiatives as required.

Plan and direct, collect process, produce and disseminate intelligence, and provide, counterintelligence support to the MEF Command Element, MEF major subordinate commands, subordinate Marine Air Group Task Force(MAGTF), and other commands as directed

Photo Information

Local Thai military members listen as a Thai translator explains how to properly treat a patient for a sucking chest wound at a Tactical Casualty Care Course on Feb. 11, 2015 at Camp Samaesan, Kingdom of Thailand. The course is part of exercise Cobra Gold 2015, an annual exercise designed to advance regional security and ensure effective responses to regional crisis.

Photo by Courtesy Photo

U.S. Navy Corpsman teach Thai military members life-saving skills

13 Feb 2015 | Cpl. Joshua Murray I Marine Expeditionary Force

U.S. Navy corpsman and their Thai military counterparts are preparing for natural disaster situations with lifesaving training during exercise Cobra Gold 2015. The corpsman conducted Tactical Combat Casualty Care training on Feb. 11, 2015 at Camp Samaesan, Kingdom of Thailand.

The corpsman explained and demonstrated tactics such as the proper application of tourniquets, providing medical attention for chest wounds and how to clear the airway of a patient who cannot breathe.

While TCCC is normally aimed towards combat and other hostile environments, Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Kenzie Moore, a corpsman with Marine Wing Support Squadron 172, says the training can also help in many other circumstances. 

“The ability to do TCCC is an incredibly important tool to have in your tool box,” said Moore. “All of these types of injuries can be seen in a variety of places from bad accidents to natural disasters. If the first responders are prepared and trained, I believe a large number of fatalities could be prevented.”

The core concept of TCCC is to be tactically and medically proficient in any environment or circumstance. Everything from the time of day to the weather can affect how difficult it is to care for a patient. 
“I’ve seen too many cases in which a person just doesn’t react quickly enough and their patient ends up dying,” said Moore. “In a natural disaster, you don’t know how the weather will be or the injuries you might come across, but you need to be able to react quickly and effectively to save the lives of those people who need your help.”

Hospital Corpsman Casey Becker, a corpsman with Marine Wing Headquarters Squadron 1 who role-played as the casualty for the course, said he is more than happy to volunteer for training events such as this one.

“I decided to become a corpsman so I could reach out and help people,” said Becker, a native of Brunswick, Maine. “If I can teach somebody something that might one day save their life or the lives of others, I’m going to try my hardest to do so.”

The TCCC training enhances the capability and prepares the military members to work together in the event of a future natural disaster.
Cobra Gold is an annual, multinational training event exercise hosted at various locations throughout Thailand. In its 34th year, Cobra Gold 2015 is designed to advance regional security and ensure effective responses to regional disasters by bringing together a robust multinational force from partner nations sharing common goals and security commitments in the Asia-Pacific region.
Photo Information

Local Thai military members listen as a Thai translator explains how to properly treat a patient for a sucking chest wound at a Tactical Casualty Care Course on Feb. 11, 2015 at Camp Samaesan, Kingdom of Thailand. The course is part of exercise Cobra Gold 2015, an annual exercise designed to advance regional security and ensure effective responses to regional crisis.

Photo by Courtesy Photo

U.S. Navy Corpsman teach Thai military members life-saving skills

13 Feb 2015 | Cpl. Joshua Murray I Marine Expeditionary Force

U.S. Navy corpsman and their Thai military counterparts are preparing for natural disaster situations with lifesaving training during exercise Cobra Gold 2015. The corpsman conducted Tactical Combat Casualty Care training on Feb. 11, 2015 at Camp Samaesan, Kingdom of Thailand.

The corpsman explained and demonstrated tactics such as the proper application of tourniquets, providing medical attention for chest wounds and how to clear the airway of a patient who cannot breathe.

While TCCC is normally aimed towards combat and other hostile environments, Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Kenzie Moore, a corpsman with Marine Wing Support Squadron 172, says the training can also help in many other circumstances. 

“The ability to do TCCC is an incredibly important tool to have in your tool box,” said Moore. “All of these types of injuries can be seen in a variety of places from bad accidents to natural disasters. If the first responders are prepared and trained, I believe a large number of fatalities could be prevented.”

The core concept of TCCC is to be tactically and medically proficient in any environment or circumstance. Everything from the time of day to the weather can affect how difficult it is to care for a patient. 
“I’ve seen too many cases in which a person just doesn’t react quickly enough and their patient ends up dying,” said Moore. “In a natural disaster, you don’t know how the weather will be or the injuries you might come across, but you need to be able to react quickly and effectively to save the lives of those people who need your help.”

Hospital Corpsman Casey Becker, a corpsman with Marine Wing Headquarters Squadron 1 who role-played as the casualty for the course, said he is more than happy to volunteer for training events such as this one.

“I decided to become a corpsman so I could reach out and help people,” said Becker, a native of Brunswick, Maine. “If I can teach somebody something that might one day save their life or the lives of others, I’m going to try my hardest to do so.”

The TCCC training enhances the capability and prepares the military members to work together in the event of a future natural disaster.
Cobra Gold is an annual, multinational training event exercise hosted at various locations throughout Thailand. In its 34th year, Cobra Gold 2015 is designed to advance regional security and ensure effective responses to regional disasters by bringing together a robust multinational force from partner nations sharing common goals and security commitments in the Asia-Pacific region.
Photo Information

Local Thai military members listen as a Thai translator explains how to properly treat a patient for a sucking chest wound at a Tactical Casualty Care Course on Feb. 11, 2015 at Camp Samaesan, Kingdom of Thailand. The course is part of exercise Cobra Gold 2015, an annual exercise designed to advance regional security and ensure effective responses to regional crisis.

Photo by Courtesy Photo

U.S. Navy Corpsman teach Thai military members life-saving skills

13 Feb 2015 | Cpl. Joshua Murray I Marine Expeditionary Force

U.S. Navy corpsman and their Thai military counterparts are preparing for natural disaster situations with lifesaving training during exercise Cobra Gold 2015. The corpsman conducted Tactical Combat Casualty Care training on Feb. 11, 2015 at Camp Samaesan, Kingdom of Thailand.

The corpsman explained and demonstrated tactics such as the proper application of tourniquets, providing medical attention for chest wounds and how to clear the airway of a patient who cannot breathe.

While TCCC is normally aimed towards combat and other hostile environments, Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Kenzie Moore, a corpsman with Marine Wing Support Squadron 172, says the training can also help in many other circumstances. 

“The ability to do TCCC is an incredibly important tool to have in your tool box,” said Moore. “All of these types of injuries can be seen in a variety of places from bad accidents to natural disasters. If the first responders are prepared and trained, I believe a large number of fatalities could be prevented.”

The core concept of TCCC is to be tactically and medically proficient in any environment or circumstance. Everything from the time of day to the weather can affect how difficult it is to care for a patient. 
“I’ve seen too many cases in which a person just doesn’t react quickly enough and their patient ends up dying,” said Moore. “In a natural disaster, you don’t know how the weather will be or the injuries you might come across, but you need to be able to react quickly and effectively to save the lives of those people who need your help.”

Hospital Corpsman Casey Becker, a corpsman with Marine Wing Headquarters Squadron 1 who role-played as the casualty for the course, said he is more than happy to volunteer for training events such as this one.

“I decided to become a corpsman so I could reach out and help people,” said Becker, a native of Brunswick, Maine. “If I can teach somebody something that might one day save their life or the lives of others, I’m going to try my hardest to do so.”

The TCCC training enhances the capability and prepares the military members to work together in the event of a future natural disaster.
Cobra Gold is an annual, multinational training event exercise hosted at various locations throughout Thailand. In its 34th year, Cobra Gold 2015 is designed to advance regional security and ensure effective responses to regional disasters by bringing together a robust multinational force from partner nations sharing common goals and security commitments in the Asia-Pacific region.