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I Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF) Information Group (I MIG) provides administrative, training, and logistical support while in CONUS and forward deployed to the I MEF and I MEB Command Elements. Additionally, function as Higher Headquarters for the four Major Subordinate Elements in order to allow I MEF CE to execute warfighting functions in support of service and COCOM initiatives as required.

Plan and direct, collect process, produce and disseminate intelligence, and provide, counterintelligence support to the MEF Command Element, MEF major subordinate commands, subordinate Marine Air Group Task Force(MAGTF), and other commands as directed

Photo Information

Sailors from units across Camp Pendleton attend the Petty Officer Selectee Leadership Course June 3, 2015, at Field Medical Training Battalion-West aboard Camp Pendleton, Calif. The course is designed to equip Sailors with the skills and information they need to be effective leaders.

Photo by Lance Cpl. April Price

Petty officer selectees prepare for new role, responsibilities

8 Jun 2015 | Lance Cpl. April Price I Marine Expeditionary Force

There are many things newly-advanced petty officers need to know to continue to be successful in their career.  During the petty officer selectee leadership course, Sailors learn what it means to be a petty officer and the responsibilities that accompany their new rank.

Sailors from Camp Pendleton attended the Petty Officer Selectee Leadership Course on June 3, 2015, at Field Medical Training Battalion-West aboard Camp Pendleton, California. This course is designed to equip Sailors with the skills and information they need to be effective leaders.

“This is the perfect opportunity for these Sailors to learn about what is expected as petty officers in today’s Navy,” said Chief Petty Officer Kory D. Hernandez, a chief hospital corpsman and Petty Officer Indoctrination Course instructor.  “It’s our job to give them the tools and information needed to become successful leaders, but it’s up to them to take in this information and use it in a positive way for the Navy, themselves and their families.”

The Petty Officer Selectee Leadership Course was developed to incorporate a variety of leadership-related subjects that will build a foundation for self-development.  The course included basic leadership knowledge and responsibility with discussions of values, discipline and standards.

“This course goes over everything needed to become a better Sailor and perhaps a better person in general,” said Petty Officer 2nd Class Paul M. Ludlam, a religious program specialist and a student in the course.  “We are taught how to handle our rank and how to handle our subordinates as well as many other areas of naval leadership.

"With that being said, advancing in rank will give us the opportunity to help out younger Sailors and guide them in the right path. That is part of becoming a leader in the Navy.”

With promotion comes additional responsibility and authority, accompanied by higher accountability. Promotion to petty officer is not just a raise in pay.  It is a shift in roles from being led to learning how to lead.


Photo Information

Sailors from units across Camp Pendleton attend the Petty Officer Selectee Leadership Course June 3, 2015, at Field Medical Training Battalion-West aboard Camp Pendleton, Calif. The course is designed to equip Sailors with the skills and information they need to be effective leaders.

Photo by Lance Cpl. April Price

Petty officer selectees prepare for new role, responsibilities

8 Jun 2015 | Lance Cpl. April Price I Marine Expeditionary Force

There are many things newly-advanced petty officers need to know to continue to be successful in their career.  During the petty officer selectee leadership course, Sailors learn what it means to be a petty officer and the responsibilities that accompany their new rank.

Sailors from Camp Pendleton attended the Petty Officer Selectee Leadership Course on June 3, 2015, at Field Medical Training Battalion-West aboard Camp Pendleton, California. This course is designed to equip Sailors with the skills and information they need to be effective leaders.

“This is the perfect opportunity for these Sailors to learn about what is expected as petty officers in today’s Navy,” said Chief Petty Officer Kory D. Hernandez, a chief hospital corpsman and Petty Officer Indoctrination Course instructor.  “It’s our job to give them the tools and information needed to become successful leaders, but it’s up to them to take in this information and use it in a positive way for the Navy, themselves and their families.”

The Petty Officer Selectee Leadership Course was developed to incorporate a variety of leadership-related subjects that will build a foundation for self-development.  The course included basic leadership knowledge and responsibility with discussions of values, discipline and standards.

“This course goes over everything needed to become a better Sailor and perhaps a better person in general,” said Petty Officer 2nd Class Paul M. Ludlam, a religious program specialist and a student in the course.  “We are taught how to handle our rank and how to handle our subordinates as well as many other areas of naval leadership.

"With that being said, advancing in rank will give us the opportunity to help out younger Sailors and guide them in the right path. That is part of becoming a leader in the Navy.”

With promotion comes additional responsibility and authority, accompanied by higher accountability. Promotion to petty officer is not just a raise in pay.  It is a shift in roles from being led to learning how to lead.


Photo Information

Sailors from units across Camp Pendleton attend the Petty Officer Selectee Leadership Course June 3, 2015, at Field Medical Training Battalion-West aboard Camp Pendleton, Calif. The course is designed to equip Sailors with the skills and information they need to be effective leaders.

Photo by Lance Cpl. April Price

Petty officer selectees prepare for new role, responsibilities

8 Jun 2015 | Lance Cpl. April Price I Marine Expeditionary Force

There are many things newly-advanced petty officers need to know to continue to be successful in their career.  During the petty officer selectee leadership course, Sailors learn what it means to be a petty officer and the responsibilities that accompany their new rank.

Sailors from Camp Pendleton attended the Petty Officer Selectee Leadership Course on June 3, 2015, at Field Medical Training Battalion-West aboard Camp Pendleton, California. This course is designed to equip Sailors with the skills and information they need to be effective leaders.

“This is the perfect opportunity for these Sailors to learn about what is expected as petty officers in today’s Navy,” said Chief Petty Officer Kory D. Hernandez, a chief hospital corpsman and Petty Officer Indoctrination Course instructor.  “It’s our job to give them the tools and information needed to become successful leaders, but it’s up to them to take in this information and use it in a positive way for the Navy, themselves and their families.”

The Petty Officer Selectee Leadership Course was developed to incorporate a variety of leadership-related subjects that will build a foundation for self-development.  The course included basic leadership knowledge and responsibility with discussions of values, discipline and standards.

“This course goes over everything needed to become a better Sailor and perhaps a better person in general,” said Petty Officer 2nd Class Paul M. Ludlam, a religious program specialist and a student in the course.  “We are taught how to handle our rank and how to handle our subordinates as well as many other areas of naval leadership.

"With that being said, advancing in rank will give us the opportunity to help out younger Sailors and guide them in the right path. That is part of becoming a leader in the Navy.”

With promotion comes additional responsibility and authority, accompanied by higher accountability. Promotion to petty officer is not just a raise in pay.  It is a shift in roles from being led to learning how to lead.