Collapse All Expand All
 

I Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF) Information Group (I MIG) provides administrative, training, and logistical support while in CONUS and forward deployed to the I MEF and I MEB Command Elements. Additionally, function as Higher Headquarters for the four Major Subordinate Elements in order to allow I MEF CE to execute warfighting functions in support of service and COCOM initiatives as required.

Plan and direct, collect process, produce and disseminate intelligence, and provide, counterintelligence support to the MEF Command Element, MEF major subordinate commands, subordinate Marine Air Group Task Force(MAGTF), and other commands as directed

Photo Information

A humvee departs an explosives range aboard Task Force Al Taqaddum Air Base, Iraq. Explosive Ordnance Disposal Marines with Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force - Crisis Response - Central Command 16.2 assigned to TFTQ are currently engaged in building partership capacity with Iraqi Security Forces.

Photo by Sgt. Seth Starr

Marines train Iraqis, implement IED countermeasures

3 May 2016 | Sgt. Seth Starr I Marine Expeditionary Force

AL TAQADDUM AIR BASE, Iraq – It was an arid and wind-torn scene when Marines Task Force Taqaddum set off outside the wire in armored Humvees and mine-resistant ambush protected assault vehicles May 2 to 3, 2016. Their mission was to advise and assist Iraqi army soldiers with the 8th Iraqi Army Division in counter improvised explosive device techniques.

 The mood was tense as Marines made their way to the 8th IAD’s headquarters, near which sightings of militia groups was reported days prior. After the drive down a road littered with splintered vehicles and gnarled vehicular armor from previous conflicts, the Marines arrived at their destination unscathed.

 Chief Warrant Officer 3 James Morgan, an explosive ordnance disposal officer assigned to TFTQ, was the training facilitator and took provisional steps to ensure ISF training was relevant and applicable for their continuing fight against the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant. He conveyed that although IEDs aren’t a new threat to ISF, it’s important to reiterate the basics and key concepts.

“In the past we’ve seen the effectiveness and diversity of (improvised explosive devices) throughout these areas of conflict; the key here is to make sure they understand the many dangers that come in dealing with such a highly saturated area,” said Morgan.

 Reiterating key concepts was Morgan and his team’s goal for today. The Marines parked their vehicles inside a high-walled compound and were promptly greeted by ISF soldiers. The day’s training included IED recognition, from IEDs hidden in trees or vegetation to ones that are buried or even booby-trapped in a building – with special attention directed to signs that may indicate possible IED placement. In addition, Morgan and his Marines taught their Iraqi counterparts’ offensive tactics in the disarming and disposal of explosive charges, in addition to planning and execution measures that ensure success.

 With ISIL so close in proximity to their training location – mere miles away – the gravity of the situation at hand reflected on the faces of ISF soldiers when given information on new tactics ISIL is using.

 The ISF soldiers made it clear through the course of the afternoon that they were very eager to learn and implement techniques to better secure the battlefield and as one soldier said, “take back our country from these cowards and murderers,” referring to ISIL fighters.

 Marines assigned to TFTQ will continue to support the Combined Joint Task Force – Operation Inherent Resolve building partner capacity mission to increase the military capacity of Iraqi security forces as they continue their fight against ISIL.


More Media

Photo Information

A humvee departs an explosives range aboard Task Force Al Taqaddum Air Base, Iraq. Explosive Ordnance Disposal Marines with Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force - Crisis Response - Central Command 16.2 assigned to TFTQ are currently engaged in building partership capacity with Iraqi Security Forces.

Photo by Sgt. Seth Starr

Marines train Iraqis, implement IED countermeasures

3 May 2016 | Sgt. Seth Starr I Marine Expeditionary Force

AL TAQADDUM AIR BASE, Iraq – It was an arid and wind-torn scene when Marines Task Force Taqaddum set off outside the wire in armored Humvees and mine-resistant ambush protected assault vehicles May 2 to 3, 2016. Their mission was to advise and assist Iraqi army soldiers with the 8th Iraqi Army Division in counter improvised explosive device techniques.

 The mood was tense as Marines made their way to the 8th IAD’s headquarters, near which sightings of militia groups was reported days prior. After the drive down a road littered with splintered vehicles and gnarled vehicular armor from previous conflicts, the Marines arrived at their destination unscathed.

 Chief Warrant Officer 3 James Morgan, an explosive ordnance disposal officer assigned to TFTQ, was the training facilitator and took provisional steps to ensure ISF training was relevant and applicable for their continuing fight against the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant. He conveyed that although IEDs aren’t a new threat to ISF, it’s important to reiterate the basics and key concepts.

“In the past we’ve seen the effectiveness and diversity of (improvised explosive devices) throughout these areas of conflict; the key here is to make sure they understand the many dangers that come in dealing with such a highly saturated area,” said Morgan.

 Reiterating key concepts was Morgan and his team’s goal for today. The Marines parked their vehicles inside a high-walled compound and were promptly greeted by ISF soldiers. The day’s training included IED recognition, from IEDs hidden in trees or vegetation to ones that are buried or even booby-trapped in a building – with special attention directed to signs that may indicate possible IED placement. In addition, Morgan and his Marines taught their Iraqi counterparts’ offensive tactics in the disarming and disposal of explosive charges, in addition to planning and execution measures that ensure success.

 With ISIL so close in proximity to their training location – mere miles away – the gravity of the situation at hand reflected on the faces of ISF soldiers when given information on new tactics ISIL is using.

 The ISF soldiers made it clear through the course of the afternoon that they were very eager to learn and implement techniques to better secure the battlefield and as one soldier said, “take back our country from these cowards and murderers,” referring to ISIL fighters.

 Marines assigned to TFTQ will continue to support the Combined Joint Task Force – Operation Inherent Resolve building partner capacity mission to increase the military capacity of Iraqi security forces as they continue their fight against ISIL.


More Media

Photo Information

A humvee departs an explosives range aboard Task Force Al Taqaddum Air Base, Iraq. Explosive Ordnance Disposal Marines with Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force - Crisis Response - Central Command 16.2 assigned to TFTQ are currently engaged in building partership capacity with Iraqi Security Forces.

Photo by Sgt. Seth Starr

Marines train Iraqis, implement IED countermeasures

3 May 2016 | Sgt. Seth Starr I Marine Expeditionary Force

AL TAQADDUM AIR BASE, Iraq – It was an arid and wind-torn scene when Marines Task Force Taqaddum set off outside the wire in armored Humvees and mine-resistant ambush protected assault vehicles May 2 to 3, 2016. Their mission was to advise and assist Iraqi army soldiers with the 8th Iraqi Army Division in counter improvised explosive device techniques.

 The mood was tense as Marines made their way to the 8th IAD’s headquarters, near which sightings of militia groups was reported days prior. After the drive down a road littered with splintered vehicles and gnarled vehicular armor from previous conflicts, the Marines arrived at their destination unscathed.

 Chief Warrant Officer 3 James Morgan, an explosive ordnance disposal officer assigned to TFTQ, was the training facilitator and took provisional steps to ensure ISF training was relevant and applicable for their continuing fight against the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant. He conveyed that although IEDs aren’t a new threat to ISF, it’s important to reiterate the basics and key concepts.

“In the past we’ve seen the effectiveness and diversity of (improvised explosive devices) throughout these areas of conflict; the key here is to make sure they understand the many dangers that come in dealing with such a highly saturated area,” said Morgan.

 Reiterating key concepts was Morgan and his team’s goal for today. The Marines parked their vehicles inside a high-walled compound and were promptly greeted by ISF soldiers. The day’s training included IED recognition, from IEDs hidden in trees or vegetation to ones that are buried or even booby-trapped in a building – with special attention directed to signs that may indicate possible IED placement. In addition, Morgan and his Marines taught their Iraqi counterparts’ offensive tactics in the disarming and disposal of explosive charges, in addition to planning and execution measures that ensure success.

 With ISIL so close in proximity to their training location – mere miles away – the gravity of the situation at hand reflected on the faces of ISF soldiers when given information on new tactics ISIL is using.

 The ISF soldiers made it clear through the course of the afternoon that they were very eager to learn and implement techniques to better secure the battlefield and as one soldier said, “take back our country from these cowards and murderers,” referring to ISIL fighters.

 Marines assigned to TFTQ will continue to support the Combined Joint Task Force – Operation Inherent Resolve building partner capacity mission to increase the military capacity of Iraqi security forces as they continue their fight against ISIL.


More Media