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I Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF) Information Group (I MIG) provides administrative, training, and logistical support while in CONUS and forward deployed to the I MEF and I MEB Command Elements. Additionally, function as Higher Headquarters for the four Major Subordinate Elements in order to allow I MEF CE to execute warfighting functions in support of service and COCOM initiatives as required.

Plan and direct, collect process, produce and disseminate intelligence, and provide, counterintelligence support to the MEF Command Element, MEF major subordinate commands, subordinate Marine Air Group Task Force(MAGTF), and other commands as directed

Photo Information

U.S. Marine Cpl. Ernesto VegaHernandez conducts a joint limited technical inspection of a recently refurbished Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicles, and the lighter version--MATV or MRAP All-Terrain Vehicle. The Kendall, Fla. native was a part of a select group of mechanics and communications maintainers with Combat Logistics Battalion 5, Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force – Crisis Response – Central Command tasked with ensuring the vehicles were ready to be shipped to Iraq, where Marines are supporting Iraqi Security Forces in the fight against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. SPMAGTF – CR – CC is a self-sustaining expeditionary unit, designed to provide a broad range of crisis response capabilities throughout the Central Command area of responsibility, using organic aviation, logistical, and ground combat assets. (Photo by SSgt. Lynn Kinney/ Released)

Photo by Staff Sgt. Lynn Kinney

Miami Marine supports fight against ISIL

20 Sep 2016 | Staff Sgt. Lynn Kinney I Marine Expeditionary Force

Eager to give back to the country that provided his family so many opportunities, Marine Cpl. Ernesto VegaHernandez was like most Marines when they enter the Marine Corps - eager to deploy.

Three years into his enlistment, and after supporting various units and training exercises, the Florida native is currently forward deployed in Southwest Asia as a motor transportation mechanic with Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force – Crisis Response – Central Command.

Vega is part of a select group of motor transportation mechanics and communications maintainers who conducted joint limited technical inspections of recently refurbished Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected vehicles, and the lighter version--MATV or Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected All-Terrain Vehicle. The vehicles are being shipped to Iraq, where Marines are supporting Iraqi Security Forces in the fight against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. These vehicles are the Marines’ only protection against improvised explosive devices.

“I thought I would be doing just another LTI, but the fact that I get to inspect these vehicles and ensure that these Marines will have the best vehicles to use, is something more than just showing up to work and turning a wrench. It actually might save a life,” said Vega, whose parents moved him to the U.S. from Cuba as a child because of the required service in the Cuban Armed Forces.

“A base or outpost with MATVs gives the commander, and his security forces, mobile, armored assets that can repel an assault,” said 1st Lt. Damali Brimm, of Brooklyn, N.Y. These “like-new” vehicles give Marines, often located at remote combat outposts, the ability to conduct defensive mobile actions in the event of a complex enemy attack, he said.

According to Brimm, a supply officer, the vehicle reset was directed by Marine Corps Logistics Command to ensure that all MATVs in the Marine Corps inventory have the required survivability upgrades and modifications.

“It is definitely a little surreal,” said Vega of finally getting the opportunity to serve with the unit, whose mission as the 911-Force in the Central Command area of responsibility spans 20 countries.

The vehicles are often pre-positioned reducing reaction time and eliminating the need to otherwise deploy this equipment from locations in the continental United States, with all the attendant burdens on strategic lift that this would entail, according to the U.S. Marine Corps Concepts and Programs project.


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Photo Information

U.S. Marine Cpl. Ernesto VegaHernandez conducts a joint limited technical inspection of a recently refurbished Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicles, and the lighter version--MATV or MRAP All-Terrain Vehicle. The Kendall, Fla. native was a part of a select group of mechanics and communications maintainers with Combat Logistics Battalion 5, Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force – Crisis Response – Central Command tasked with ensuring the vehicles were ready to be shipped to Iraq, where Marines are supporting Iraqi Security Forces in the fight against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. SPMAGTF – CR – CC is a self-sustaining expeditionary unit, designed to provide a broad range of crisis response capabilities throughout the Central Command area of responsibility, using organic aviation, logistical, and ground combat assets. (Photo by SSgt. Lynn Kinney/ Released)

Photo by Staff Sgt. Lynn Kinney

Miami Marine supports fight against ISIL

20 Sep 2016 | Staff Sgt. Lynn Kinney I Marine Expeditionary Force

Eager to give back to the country that provided his family so many opportunities, Marine Cpl. Ernesto VegaHernandez was like most Marines when they enter the Marine Corps - eager to deploy.

Three years into his enlistment, and after supporting various units and training exercises, the Florida native is currently forward deployed in Southwest Asia as a motor transportation mechanic with Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force – Crisis Response – Central Command.

Vega is part of a select group of motor transportation mechanics and communications maintainers who conducted joint limited technical inspections of recently refurbished Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected vehicles, and the lighter version--MATV or Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected All-Terrain Vehicle. The vehicles are being shipped to Iraq, where Marines are supporting Iraqi Security Forces in the fight against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. These vehicles are the Marines’ only protection against improvised explosive devices.

“I thought I would be doing just another LTI, but the fact that I get to inspect these vehicles and ensure that these Marines will have the best vehicles to use, is something more than just showing up to work and turning a wrench. It actually might save a life,” said Vega, whose parents moved him to the U.S. from Cuba as a child because of the required service in the Cuban Armed Forces.

“A base or outpost with MATVs gives the commander, and his security forces, mobile, armored assets that can repel an assault,” said 1st Lt. Damali Brimm, of Brooklyn, N.Y. These “like-new” vehicles give Marines, often located at remote combat outposts, the ability to conduct defensive mobile actions in the event of a complex enemy attack, he said.

According to Brimm, a supply officer, the vehicle reset was directed by Marine Corps Logistics Command to ensure that all MATVs in the Marine Corps inventory have the required survivability upgrades and modifications.

“It is definitely a little surreal,” said Vega of finally getting the opportunity to serve with the unit, whose mission as the 911-Force in the Central Command area of responsibility spans 20 countries.

The vehicles are often pre-positioned reducing reaction time and eliminating the need to otherwise deploy this equipment from locations in the continental United States, with all the attendant burdens on strategic lift that this would entail, according to the U.S. Marine Corps Concepts and Programs project.


More Media

Photo Information

U.S. Marine Cpl. Ernesto VegaHernandez conducts a joint limited technical inspection of a recently refurbished Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicles, and the lighter version--MATV or MRAP All-Terrain Vehicle. The Kendall, Fla. native was a part of a select group of mechanics and communications maintainers with Combat Logistics Battalion 5, Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force – Crisis Response – Central Command tasked with ensuring the vehicles were ready to be shipped to Iraq, where Marines are supporting Iraqi Security Forces in the fight against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. SPMAGTF – CR – CC is a self-sustaining expeditionary unit, designed to provide a broad range of crisis response capabilities throughout the Central Command area of responsibility, using organic aviation, logistical, and ground combat assets. (Photo by SSgt. Lynn Kinney/ Released)

Photo by Staff Sgt. Lynn Kinney

Miami Marine supports fight against ISIL

20 Sep 2016 | Staff Sgt. Lynn Kinney I Marine Expeditionary Force

Eager to give back to the country that provided his family so many opportunities, Marine Cpl. Ernesto VegaHernandez was like most Marines when they enter the Marine Corps - eager to deploy.

Three years into his enlistment, and after supporting various units and training exercises, the Florida native is currently forward deployed in Southwest Asia as a motor transportation mechanic with Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force – Crisis Response – Central Command.

Vega is part of a select group of motor transportation mechanics and communications maintainers who conducted joint limited technical inspections of recently refurbished Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected vehicles, and the lighter version--MATV or Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected All-Terrain Vehicle. The vehicles are being shipped to Iraq, where Marines are supporting Iraqi Security Forces in the fight against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. These vehicles are the Marines’ only protection against improvised explosive devices.

“I thought I would be doing just another LTI, but the fact that I get to inspect these vehicles and ensure that these Marines will have the best vehicles to use, is something more than just showing up to work and turning a wrench. It actually might save a life,” said Vega, whose parents moved him to the U.S. from Cuba as a child because of the required service in the Cuban Armed Forces.

“A base or outpost with MATVs gives the commander, and his security forces, mobile, armored assets that can repel an assault,” said 1st Lt. Damali Brimm, of Brooklyn, N.Y. These “like-new” vehicles give Marines, often located at remote combat outposts, the ability to conduct defensive mobile actions in the event of a complex enemy attack, he said.

According to Brimm, a supply officer, the vehicle reset was directed by Marine Corps Logistics Command to ensure that all MATVs in the Marine Corps inventory have the required survivability upgrades and modifications.

“It is definitely a little surreal,” said Vega of finally getting the opportunity to serve with the unit, whose mission as the 911-Force in the Central Command area of responsibility spans 20 countries.

The vehicles are often pre-positioned reducing reaction time and eliminating the need to otherwise deploy this equipment from locations in the continental United States, with all the attendant burdens on strategic lift that this would entail, according to the U.S. Marine Corps Concepts and Programs project.


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