1st Intelligence Battalion
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I MEF Information Group
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I Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF) Information Group (I MIG) provides administrative, training, and logistical support while in CONUS and forward deployed to the I MEF and I MEB Command Elements. Additionally, function as Higher Headquarters for the four Major Subordinate Elements in order to allow I MEF CE to execute warfighting functions in support of service and COCOM initiatives as required.

Plan and direct, collect process, produce and disseminate intelligence, and provide, counterintelligence support to the MEF Command Element, MEF major subordinate commands, subordinate Marine Air Group Task Force(MAGTF), and other commands as directed

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MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. – Master Chief Petty Officer Michael Smith, outgoing command master chief of I Marine Expeditionary force, ‘goes ashore’ for the last time at the conclusion of his change of charge and retirement ceremony on Camp Pendleton June 3, 2016. Stemming from the naval tradition of requesting permission to leave the ship, ‘going ashore’ signifies the honorable retirement of a sailor from naval service. Master Chief Petty Officer Frank Dominguez, a Superior, Arizona native, is replacing Smith, a Ridgecrest native, as the command master chief of I Marine Expeditionary Force. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo By Cpl. Garrett White/Released) - MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. – Master Chief Petty Officer Michael Smith, outgoing command master chief of I Marine Expeditionary force, ‘goes ashore’ for the last time at the conclusion of his change of charge and retirement ceremony on Camp Pendleton June 3, 2016. Stemming from the naval tradition of requesting permission to leave the ship, ‘going ashore’ signifies the honorable retirement of a sailor from naval service. Master Chief Petty Officer Frank Dominguez, a Superior, Arizona native, is replacing Smith, a Ridgecrest native, as the command master chief of I Marine Expeditionary Force. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo By Cpl. Garrett White/Released)

He’s a pillar of health, literally. At 6’3” and 210 pounds, armed with six years of college and eight years of military experience, Petty Officer 2nd Class John H. Holscher is a veritable tower of care and comfort for the people here, regardless of nationality. Not that any of them have a choice, because the next nearest medic is more than 100 kilometers away. 'The biggest challenge to being out here is being the only doc. (Iraqi) medics depend on me to train them, Iraqis patients depend on me, taking care of the Marines, going on every patrol, and then the villagers, I can’t take care of them all,' said Holscher, corpsman, Border Transition Team 4222. - He’s a pillar of health, literally. At 6’3” and 210 pounds, armed with six years of college and eight years of military experience, Petty Officer 2nd Class John H. Holscher is a veritable tower of care and comfort for the people here, regardless of nationality. Not that any of them have a choice, because the next nearest medic is more than 100 kilometers away. 'The biggest challenge to being out here is being the only doc. (Iraqi) medics depend on me to train them, Iraqis patients depend on me, taking care of the Marines, going on every patrol, and then the villagers, I can’t take care of them all,' said Holscher, corpsman, Border Transition Team 4222.

                      



 
I Marine Expeditionary Force